Friday 25 September, 2020

Young philanthropist hands over tablets for needy students

Imani-Leigh Hall (second right) founder of Ilah’s Lemond-Aid Stand For Kids Foundation, shares the spotlight with (from left) Nasha-Monique Douglas, chief marketing officer of Digicel Jamaica; principal of Alligator Pond Primary and Infant School, Gregory Bent; and Tricia Williams-Singh, chairperson of the Early Childhood Commission. (Photo: Marlon Reid)

Imani-Leigh Hall (second right) founder of Ilah’s Lemond-Aid Stand For Kids Foundation, shares the spotlight with (from left) Nasha-Monique Douglas, chief marketing officer of Digicel Jamaica; principal of Alligator Pond Primary and Infant School, Gregory Bent; and Tricia Williams-Singh, chairperson of the Early Childhood Commission. (Photo: Marlon Reid)

At least 25 schools will benefit from the proceeds of a charity virtual run organised by 10-year-old philanthropist Imani-Leigh Hall.

Determined to assist needy children, despite the worldwide coronavirus lockdown, Imani-Leigh’s Ilah’s Lemon-Aid Stand For Kids Foundation staged its 3K Virtual Run in May, attracting more than 150 children from more than 10 countries.

On Friday, Ilah’s Lemon-Aid Stand For Kids Foundation handed over the proceeds, 46 tablets, to the Early Childhood Commission (ECC), which has partnered with the foundation in the distribution of the devices islandwide.

Imani-Leigh thanked participants from around the world who joined the fun run from a wide variety of locations including parks, gyms, football fields and inside homes.

“The goal in mind was to help me raise funds to purchase tablets for children who do not have the necessary means to participate in online learning,” she said at the handover ceremony held at the ECC head office in Kingston.

Tricia Williams-Singh, chairperson of the Early Childhood Commission, which sourced the needy children to get the tablets, said the body was glad that more children will now be able to continue their learning online.

“COVID has brought several changes and as the regulatory body for early childhood institutions, we ensure that children are at the forefront of our plans, as we continue to mould and shape them for development. This donation will no doubt significantly boost these children,” Williams-Singh said.

Ilah’s Lemond-Aid Stand For Kids Foundation was assisted in the project by corporate sponsors Digicel, Sagicor, and Seprod through its Serge brand.

Nasha-Monique Douglas, chief marketing officer of Digicel Jamaica and Chrisette Gayle, promotion executive of Seprod, said it was an easy decision to support the project.

“Since COVID, we as a foundation also did the same, purchased several thousands of tablets to help in ensuring that kids who never had the opportunity to do so, get access to continuous learning during this time.

“It is something that we will be continuing as we move forward, because we want to make sure that every child not only have an opportunity to learn, but with the best technology possible,” Douglas said.

Gayle added: “We are proud partners with Ilah’s Lemon-Aid, regarding her initiative to give tablets for students who need it because COVID has changed our educational system. So it’s a privilege for us to have come on board.”

In the meantime, the principal of Alligator Pond Primary in Manchester, one of the schools that will benefit from the tablets, says the devices will give students unprecedented access to education.

“It allows our children to have access that they have never had before… and they can now do on their own, what they always depended on the classroom for,” Bent said.

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