Sunday 23 September, 2018

Why you won’t find many Hummers, caviar or sex toys in Cayman

Twenty-two miles long and about four miles wide, the Cayman Islands are three little landmasses uniquely perched in the Western Caribbean, resting very close to neighboring islands Cuba and Jamaica.

However, while Caribbean in location, you won’t find any roadside shops with men slamming down dominoes, loud music pelting in the streets or any peddlers trying to get you to buy trinkets, gems or crafts.

Instead, you will find a posh little island, with immaculately clean streets, high end activities like diving and parasailing and extremely mannerly people; with everyone calling you by  the title of  Mr or Miss.

Yes, we exaggerated a little bit, but for the most part the Cayman Islands are very different from the rest of the Caribbean.

Let’s face it, the major supermarkets are filled with Granny Smith apples, expensive imported bottled waters and President’s Choice Decadent Cookies.

And there is nothing wrong with that is there?  

While the island personifies luxury and 'Dartvelopment', you would be surprised to know that many of the laws have not quite caught up yet.

Here are nine bizarre things you probably didn’t know about the Cayman Islands:

1. Want to bust a move in the Cayman Islands? Beware you can’t do it on a Sunday.

The Island has a Music and Dancing (Control) Law which says that music, dancing and public entertainment are only permitted Monday- Saturday between the hours of  9.00 am and 11.45 pm. Music playing and dancing are not permitted on Sundays, Good Friday and Christmas Day.  While exceptions for music playing are granted to restaurants or hotels, still there are many stipulations and dancing is still not permitted.

2.  Self-pleasure is punishable – well not quite.

However, the importation, possession and distribution of sex toys are considered to be an offence under Cayman law- the penal code specifically.

 

3. Some Hummers are not allowed.

Under Customs laws, the import of any model of the Hummer motor vehicle which exceeds 6.8 feet in width is strictly prohibited- that’s almost every Hummer! (However, a few have been whizzing around on island) 

 

4. Have a shirt with a marijuana leaf on it, it is best to leave it at home.

The Island prohibits the importation of any goods depicting or bearing any reference to marijuana in any form. We should note, however that two Canadian companies currently sell cannabis oil to the Cayman Islands –it is medical of course.

 

5. All forms of gambling are prohibited in the Cayman Islands.

A part from an amendment to the law in 2015 which allows raffles. Even if you are in a cruise ship, it is against the island’s law to gamble when docked in a port or on Cayman Islands territorial waters.

 

6. Keep your clothing on.

Unlike other Caribbean destinations, topless bathing is strictly prohibited by law and the Island has no nude beaches.

7. Want to sit in the glaring Caribbean sun and read communist literature or a Playboy magazine? 

You won’t find any of that here. Yup, they are banned.  The Island bans some political literature, pornographic magazines and even some publishers all together.

The ban largely covers books from the former USSR, as well as some sect of Rastafarianism and even books on black magic and Obeah.

As for our friend, the late Hugh Hefner, you won’t find any of his bunnies on Seven Mile Beach.

8. The importation of rice, sugar and cement is prohibited with exceptions made of course; after all, Cayman doesn’t grow rice. Also, log and timber products from Liberia are banned.

9. Caviar is a no, no, but the island isn’t alone in that regard; several countries in the world ban the importation of some types of caviar as Beluga sturgeon is considered to be critically endangered.

Beluga caviar is the most expensive type with market prices ranging from $7,000 to $10,000/kg.

Here is an extra one...

Caymanians don’t take disrespect lightly, so watch what you write. In 2016, A US visitor who used “indecent words” on his customs declaration form was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct.