Wednesday 19 September, 2018

VM, Prayer Breakfast Committee hand over $450,000 to School of Hope

Victoria Mutual Building Society’s Chief Executive Officer, Peter Reid (left), presents the donation cheque to Chairman of the Randolf School of Hope, Linton Smith (3rd right). Joining in the moment are (l-r) Courtney Campbell, VM Group President and CEO; Rt. Rev. Stanley Clarke, Chairman, NLPB Committee; Judith Forth-Blake, VM Group Chief Customer and Brand Officer; Kwesi Lowe, Randolf School of Hope Head Boy and Sylvestina Reid, Principal, Randolf School of Hope.

Victoria Mutual Building Society’s Chief Executive Officer, Peter Reid (left), presents the donation cheque to Chairman of the Randolf School of Hope, Linton Smith (3rd right). Joining in the moment are (l-r) Courtney Campbell, VM Group President and CEO; Rt. Rev. Stanley Clarke, Chairman, NLPB Committee; Judith Forth-Blake, VM Group Chief Customer and Brand Officer; Kwesi Lowe, Randolf School of Hope Head Boy and Sylvestina Reid, Principal, Randolf School of Hope.

The National Leadership Prayer Breakfast (NLPB) Committee and Victoria Mutual (VM) on Wednesday, presented a cheque valued at $450,000 to the Randolf Lopez School of Hope, the NLPB 2018 Charity project.

Each year the NLPB Committee contributes the money collected at the National Leadership Prayer breakfast, to a selected project or charity. The donation represents funds that were collected at the Prayer Breakfast in January of this year.

VM is the main sponsor of the National Leadership Prayer Breakfast.

(Left) Courtney Campbell, VM Group President and CEO, greets Sylvestina Reid (right), Principal of the Randolf Lopez School of Hope. Looking on are (l-r) Rt. Rev. Stanley Clarke, Chairman of the NLPB Committee, and Randolf School of Hope’s Head Boy and Head Girl, Kwesi Lowe and Tricia-Lee Nelson.The Randolf Lopez School of Hope is one of five schools of Special Education jointly operated by the Jamaica Association on Intellectual Disabilities (JAID) and the Ministry of Education.

The school was established in 1956 by a parent and was formerly called the School of Hope. The mandate of the school is to serve children six-20 years old with moderate and severe intellectual disabilities. These are children with significant developmental delays and are unable to meet age appropriate expectations that are based on the typical sequence of development.