Monday 11 November, 2019

Order needed in entertainment industry, says Holness

Prime Minister Andrew Holness addressing a ceremony in Gordon Town, St Andrew, on Sunday  to commemorate the centenary of the birth of late cultural ambassador, Louise Bennett-Coverley, affectionately known as “Miss Lou”.

Prime Minister Andrew Holness addressing a ceremony in Gordon Town, St Andrew, on Sunday to commemorate the centenary of the birth of late cultural ambassador, Louise Bennett-Coverley, affectionately known as “Miss Lou”.

Prime Minister Andrew Holness has assured players in the entertainment industry that his government has no plans to stymie their efforts to make an honest living.

Speaking at an event to honour the 100th anniversary of the birth of cultural icon, Louise Bennett-Coverley at Gordon Town in St Andrew on Monday, Holness said the government was aware of the concerns of the players in the industry who are complaining that the Night Noise Abatement Act is ruining their businesses.

“We hear the cry of the entertainment community. We hear the cry of the dancehall community, we hear the cries of the entertainers, the sound system operators, we hear you. But as the society evolves, we must find a consensus for order. Order is the basis on which everyone can grow and not just grow but thrive,” Holness said.

“We cannot just make decisions by who has the louder voice and the most influential advocates. We have to make decisions that are fair."

However, Holness assured the players in the industry that, despite the need for order, a way will be carved out to allow for parties to go on until daybreak with the establishment of special entertainment zones.

“There is a need for special entertainment zones. Call them creative oases, where there will be proper facilities for security, for parking, a proper stage. We need to embrace it because we cannot afford to allow the culture to cave in on itself,” he said.

He assured the industry players that the government has no intention of cutting off the income flow of those who earn off parties. Nightly dances provide earnings for a variety of persons including food and liquor vendors, taxi operators, liquor stores, hair dressers, security guards and parking attendants.

“It could never be the intention of government to stifle the culture which is necessary, necessary for the development of our people,” Holness said.

 

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