Friday 21 September, 2018

Here’s What We Know: Seaga deserves honour, but not with controversy

L-R: Ambassador of the People's Republic of China to Jamaica, Tian Qi; Juliet Holness, wife of Prime Minister Andrew Holness; former Prime Minister Edward Seaga; Prime Minister Andrew Holness; Culture Minister Olivia Grange; and Local Government Minister Desmond McKenzie following the official renaming ceremony for the Edward Seaga Highway.

L-R: Ambassador of the People's Republic of China to Jamaica, Tian Qi; Juliet Holness, wife of Prime Minister Andrew Holness; former Prime Minister Edward Seaga; Prime Minister Andrew Holness; Culture Minister Olivia Grange; and Local Government Minister Desmond McKenzie following the official renaming ceremony for the Edward Seaga Highway.

It is pretty obvious that heavy dosages of politics were behind the Government’s recent decision, which was carried out, to rename the North-South leg of the Highway 2000 toll road network in honour of former Prime Minister, Edward Seaga, and the vehement resistance of the move by the Opposition People’s National Party (PNP).

The governing Jamaica Labour Party (JLP) said ‘Edward Seaga’, while the PNP urged the naming of the highway after ‘Portia Simpson Miller’, another former Prime Minister.

And interestingly, the Government’s move along the highway came amid two other recent bestowal or announced bestowal of honour on Edward Seaga, its most prominent living former leader. First it was the corporate office at Petrojam that was renamed in his honour, then it was announced that Tivoli Gardens High School, which Seaga virtually built, is to be similarly renamed in his honour.

Then came part three, which hit the fan and has since been a highly partisan subject matter that came to a head last Tuesday with a glitzy ceremony to formally rename the highway in Moneague, St Ann amid fervent protest from PNP leaders and supporters at the Caymanas entrance to the roadway and, even worse, continued indication from the Opposition party that the Government’s decision could be reversed whenever the PNP returns to state power.

Loopholes were evident in both parties’ actions and stated positions, which are the focal points of this week’s Here’s What We Know’ video feature below, which was edited by Shawn Barnes.

 

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