Tuesday 20 November, 2018

5 STDs you can get without having sex

You meet someone, spend the night making out with them and go home satisfied that you are safe, you haven’t exposed yourself to any diseases or infections because you didn’t actually have sex.

Actual intercourse is, however, not the only way Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) are spread. It is possible to contract an infection without having intercourse.

Here are seven STDs you can get even with your clothes on.

1: Molluscum contagiosum

What is it?

According to WebMD, this is a skin infection that causes small pearly or flesh-coloured bumps. The infection is caused by a virus.

How is it spread?

This virus is spread through skin-to-skin contact. This includes sexual contact or touching the bumps and then touching the skin. You can also contract the virus from touching an object such as a towel.

Symptoms

Small painless bumps may appear alone or in groups. They most often appear on the trunk, face, eyelids, or genital area.

2: Herpes

What is it?

Kissing someone can result in you contracting oral herpes which is caused by HSV-1 and can result in cold sores or fever blisters on or around the mouth. Most people, however, do not have any symptoms.

How is it spread?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Herpes can be spread via herpes sore, saliva or genital secretions or via skin in the oral area if your partner has an oral herpes infection, or skin in the genital area if your partner has a genital herpes infection.

Symptoms

Pain, burning, tingling, or itching occurs at the infection site before the sores appear. Then clusters of blisters erupt. These blisters break down rapidly and, when seen, appear as tiny, shallow, grey ulcers on a red base. A few days later, they become crusted or scabbed and appear drier and more yellow. Sores may occur on the lips, the gums, the front of the tongue, the inside of the cheeks, the throat, and the roof of the mouth.

3: Chlamydia

Chlamydia is a common STD that can infect both men and women. It can cause serious, permanent damage to a woman’s reproductive system which can result in difficulties to conceive.

How is it spread?

You can get Chlamydia through vaginal, anal or oral sex with someone who is infected.

Symptoms

Women with symptoms may notice

  • An abnormal vaginal discharge;
  • A burning sensation when urinating.

Symptoms in men can include

  • A discharge from their penis;
  • A burning sensation when urinating;
  • Pain and swelling in one or both testicles (although this is less common).

4: Trichomoniasis

What is it?

Known as “trich”, this is a very common sexually transmitted disease caused by infection with a protozoan parasite called Trichomonas vaginalis.

How is it spread?

The CDC states that the parasite passes from an infected person to an uninfected person during sex. In women, the most commonly infected part of the body is the lower genital tract (vulva, vagina, cervix, or urethra). In men, the most commonly infected body part is the inside of the penis (urethra). During sex, the parasite usually spreads from a penis to a vagina, or from a vagina to a penis. It can also spread from a vagina to another vagina.

Symptoms

Men with trichomoniasis may notice itching or irritation inside the penis, burning after urination or ejaculation and discharge from the penis. Women with trichomoniasis may notice itching, burning, redness or soreness of the genitals, discomfort with urination and a change in their vaginal discharge (i.e., thin discharge or increased volume) that can be clear, white, yellowish, or greenish with an unusual fishy smell.

5: HPV (Human papillomavirus)

What is it?

HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI). There are many different types of HPV. Some types can cause health problems including genital warts and cancers.

How is it spread?

While you can contract HPV from vaginal and anal sex, you can also get it from oral sex with someone who has the virus.

Symptoms

The CDC says most people with HPV do not know they are infected and never develop symptoms or health problems from it. Some people find out they have HPV when they get genital warts. Women may find out they have HPV when they get an abnormal Pap test result (during cervical cancer screening). Others may only find out once they’ve developed more serious problems from HPV, such as cancers.

Source: CDC and WebMD